By Mary Luckhurst

This wide-ranging Companion to fashionable British and Irish Drama deals demanding analyses of a number of performs of their political contexts. It explores the cultural, social, financial and institutional agendas that readers have to interact with on the way to have fun with smooth theatre in all its complexity.

  • An authoritative consultant to trendy British and Irish drama.
  • Engages with theoretical discourses demanding a canon that has privileged London in addition to white English men and realism.
  • Topics coated contain: nationwide, local and fringe theatres; post-colonial phases and multiculturalism; feminist and queer theatres; intercourse and consumerism; know-how and globalisation; representations of conflict, terrorism, and trauma.

Content:
Chapter 1 family and Imperial Politics in Britain and eire: The Testimony of Irish Theatre (pages 7–21): Victor Merriman
Chapter 2 Reinventing England (pages 22–34): Declan Kiberd
Chapter three Ibsen within the English Theatre within the Fin De Siecle (pages 35–47): Katherine Newey
Chapter four New girl Drama (pages 48–60): Sally Ledger
Chapter five Shaw one of the Artists (pages 63–74): Jan McDonald
Chapter 6 Granville Barker and the court docket Dramatists (pages 75–86): Cary M. Mazer
Chapter 7 Gregory, Yeats and Ireland'S Abbey Theatre (pages 87–98): Mary Trotter
Chapter eight Suffrage Theatre: neighborhood Activism and Political dedication (pages 99–109): Susan Carlson
Chapter nine Unlocking Synge this present day (pages 110–124): Christopher Murray
Chapter 10 Sean O'Casey's robust Fireworks (pages 125–137): Jean Chothia
Chapter eleven Auden and Eliot: Theatres of the Thirties (pages 138–150): Robin Grove
Chapter 12 Empire and sophistication within the Theatre of John Arden and Margaretta D'Arcy (pages 153–163): Mary Brewer
Chapter thirteen whilst was once the Golden Age? Narratives of Loss and Decline: John Osborne, Arnold Wesker and Rodney Ackland (pages 164–174): Stephen Lacey
Chapter 14 A advertisement good fortune: girls Playwrights within the Fifties (pages 175–187): Susan Bennett
Chapter 15 domestic innovations from in a foreign country: Mustapha Matura (pages 188–197): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter sixteen The continues to be of the British Empire: the performs of Winsome Pinnock (pages 198–209): Gabriele Griffin
Chapter 17 Wilde's Comedies (pages 213–224): Richard Allen Cave
Chapter 18 constantly performing: Noel Coward and the acting Self (pages 225–236): Frances Gray
Chapter 19 Beckett'S Divine Comedy (pages 237–246): Katharine Worth
Chapter 20 shape and Ethics within the Comedies of Brendan Behan (pages 247–257): John Brannigan
Chapter 21 Joe Orton: Anger, Artifice and Absurdity (pages 258–268): David Higgins
Chapter 22 Alan Ayckbourn: Experiments in Comedy (pages 269–278): Alexander Leggatt
Chapter 23 'They either upload as much as Me': the good judgment of Tom Stoppard'S Dialogic Comedy (pages 279–288): Paul Delaney
Chapter 24 Stewart Parker's Comedy of Terrors (pages 289–298): Anthony Roche
Chapter 25 Awounded level: Drama and international conflict I (pages 301–315): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 26 Staging ‘The Holocaust’ in England (pages 316–328): John Lennard
Chapter 27 Troubling views: Northern eire, the ‘Troubles’ and Drama (pages 329–340): Helen Lojek
Chapter 28 On warfare: Charles Wood's army sense of right and wrong (pages 341–357): sunrise Fowler and John Lennard
Chapter 29 Torture within the performs of Harold Pinter (pages 358–370): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 30 Sarah Kane: from Terror to Trauma (pages 371–382): Steve Waters
Chapter 31 Theatre for the reason that 1968 (pages 385–397): David Pattie
Chapter 32 Lesbian and homosexual Theatre: All Queer at the West finish entrance (pages 398–408): John Deeney
Chapter 33 Edward Bond: Maker of Myths (pages 409–418): Michael Patterson
Chapter 34 John Mcgrath and well known Political Theatre (pages 419–428): Maria DiCenzo
Chapter 35 David Hare and Political Playwriting: among the 3rd method and the everlasting approach (pages 429–440): John Deeney
Chapter 36 Left in entrance: David Edgar's Political Theatre (pages 441–453): John Bull
Chapter 37 Liz Lochhead: author and Re?Writer: tales, historic and glossy (pages 454–465): Jan McDonald
Chapter 38 ‘Spirits that experience turn into suggest and Broken’: Tom Murphy and the ‘Famine’ of contemporary eire (pages 466–475): Shaun Richards
Chapter 39 Caryl Churchill: Feeling worldwide (pages 476–487): Elin Diamond
Chapter forty Howard Barker and the Theatre of disaster (pages 488–498): Chris Megson
Chapter forty-one studying background within the performs of Brian Friel (pages 499–508): Lionel Pilkington
Chapter forty two Marina Carr: Violence and Destruction: Language, area and panorama (pages 509–518): Cathy Leeney
Chapter forty three Scrubbing up great? Tony Harrison's Stagings of the previous (pages 519–529): Richard Rowland
Chapter forty four The query of Multiculturalism: the performs of Roy Williams (pages 530–540): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter forty five Ed Thomas: Jazz photographs within the Gaps of Language (pages 541–550): David Ian Rabey
Chapter forty six Theatre and expertise (pages 551–562): Andy Lavender

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Extra info for A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880-2005

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2 Shaw was, of course, a reader of Marx, who had argued that Ireland was the key to revolution in Britain, since overthrow of the old paternalist aristocracy was more likely to occur in the land of the Fenians first. Far from being saved by British radicals, the Irish saw themselves as saving them. The project of inventing Ireland presupposed the task of helping the neighbouring people to reinvent the idea of England. Hence the involvement of a Land League leader like Michael Davitt in the Labour interest during the general elections in Britain.

Twentieth-Century Irish Drama: Mirror up to Nation. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Pilkington, Lionel (2001). Theatre and the State in Twentieth-Century Ireland: Cultivating the People. London and New York: Routledge. Smyth, Gerry (2001). Space and the Irish Cultural Imagination. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave. Soyinka, Wole (1995). Myth, Literature and the African World. London and New York: Canto. A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880–2005 Edited by Mary Luckhurst Copyright © 2006 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd, except for editorial material and organization © 2006 by Mary Luckhurst 2 Reinventing England Declan Kiberd If the idea of England was invented by Shakespeare in his Tudor historical cycle, it may well have been reinvented through the twentieth century in a variety of plays.

Inventing Ireland: The Literature of the Modern Nation. London: Vintage. ) (2002). Reinventing Ireland. London: Pluto. Lee, J. J. (1990). Ireland 1912–1985. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lloyd, David (1999). Ireland After History. Cork: Cork University Press. Matthews, P. J. (2002). : D. P. Moran and William Rooney’, Irish Review 29, 22–37. Merriman, Victor (1999). ‘Decolonisation Postponed: The Theatre of Tiger Trash’, Irish University Review 29:2, 305–17. Merriman, Victor (2004). ). The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century Irish Drama.

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